Morning Light Bible Study

[Leviticus Chapter Four] Mercy is God’s First Response. In this chapter we come to the third kind of sacrifice, that of the sin or trespass offering. We have looked at the consecration offering and the peace or covenantal offering, now we come to the sin offering. The mention is made of “sinning in ignorance”. How does God deal with sin? God’s response to sin is to extend his mercy and provide means of returning to fellowship and relationship with Him through the shed blood of Christ. Even as His first response to sin is mercy even so our first response to sin should be mercy.

[Lev 4:1-35 KJV] 1 And the LORD spake unto Moses, saying, 2 Speak unto the children of Israel, saying, If a soul shall sin through ignorance against any of the commandments of the LORD [concerning things] which ought not to be done, and shall do against any of them: 3 If the priest that is anointed do sin according to the sin of the people; then let him bring for his sin, which he hath sinned, a young bullock without blemish unto the LORD for a sin offering. 4 And he shall bring the bullock unto the door of the tabernacle of the congregation before the LORD; and shall lay his hand upon the bullock’s head, and kill the bullock before the LORD. 5 And the priest that is anointed shall take of the bullock’s blood, and bring it to the tabernacle of the congregation: 6 And the priest shall dip his finger in the blood, and sprinkle of the blood seven times before the LORD, before the vail of the sanctuary. 7 And the priest shall put [some] of the blood upon the horns of the altar of sweet incense before the LORD, which [is] in the tabernacle of the congregation; and shall pour all the blood of the bullock at the bottom of the altar of the burnt offering, which [is at] the door of the tabernacle of the congregation. 8 And he shall take off from it all the fat of the bullock for the sin offering; the fat that covereth the inwards, and all the fat that [is] upon the inwards, 9 And the two kidneys, and the fat that [is] upon them, which [is] by the flanks, and the caul above the liver, with the kidneys, it shall he take away, 10 As it was taken off from the bullock of the sacrifice of peace offerings: and the priest shall burn them upon the altar of the burnt offering. 11 And the skin of the bullock, and all his flesh, with his head, and with his legs, and his inwards, and his dung, 12 Even the whole bullock shall he carry forth without the camp unto a clean place, where the ashes are poured out, and burn him on the wood with fire: where the ashes are poured out shall he be burnt. 13 And if the whole congregation of Israel sin through ignorance, and the thing be hid from the eyes of the assembly, and they have done [somewhat against] any of the commandments of the LORD [concerning things] which should not be done, and are guilty; 14 When the sin, which they have sinned against it, is known, then the congregation shall offer a young bullock for the sin, and bring him before the tabernacle of the congregation. 15 And the elders of the congregation shall lay their hands upon the head of the bullock before the LORD: and the bullock shall be killed before the LORD. 16 And the priest that is anointed shall bring of the bullock’s blood to the tabernacle of the congregation: 17 And the priest shall dip his finger [in some] of the blood, and sprinkle [it] seven times before the LORD, [even] before the vail. 18 And he shall put [some] of the blood upon the horns of the altar which [is] before the LORD, that [is] in the tabernacle of the congregation, and shall pour out all the blood at the bottom of the altar of the burnt offering, which [is at] the door of the tabernacle of the congregation. 19 And he shall take all his fat from him, and burn [it] upon the altar. 20 And he shall do with the bullock as he did with the bullock for a sin offering, so shall he do with this: and the priest shall make an atonement for them, and it shall be forgiven them. 21 And he shall carry forth the bullock without the camp, and burn him as he burned the first bullock: it [is] a sin offering for the congregation. 22 When a ruler hath sinned, and done [somewhat] through ignorance [against] any of the commandments of the LORD his God [concerning things] which should not be done, and is guilty; 23 Or if his sin, wherein he hath sinned, come to his knowledge; he shall bring his offering, a kid of the goats, a male without blemish: 24 And he shall lay his hand upon the head of the goat, and kill it in the place where they kill the burnt offering before the LORD: it [is] a sin offering. 25 And the priest shall take of the blood of the sin offering with his finger, and put [it] upon the horns of the altar of burnt offering, and shall pour out his blood at the bottom of the altar of burnt offering. 26 And he shall burn all his fat upon the altar, as the fat of the sacrifice of peace offerings: and the priest shall make an atonement for him as concerning his sin, and it shall be forgiven him. 27 And if any one of the common people sin through ignorance, while he doeth [somewhat against] any of the commandments of the LORD [concerning things] which ought not to be done, and be guilty; 28 Or if his sin, which he hath sinned, come to his knowledge: then he shall bring his offering, a kid of the goats, a female without blemish, for his sin which he hath sinned. 29 And he shall lay his hand upon the head of the sin offering, and slay the sin offering in the place of the burnt offering. 30 And the priest shall take of the blood thereof with his finger, and put [it] upon the horns of the altar of burnt offering, and shall pour out all the blood thereof at the bottom of the altar. 31 And he shall take away all the fat thereof, as the fat is taken away from off the sacrifice of peace offerings; and the priest shall burn [it] upon the altar for a sweet savour unto the LORD; and the priest shall make an atonement for him, and it shall be forgiven him. 32 And if he bring a lamb for a sin offering, he shall bring it a female without blemish. 33 And he shall lay his hand upon the head of the sin offering, and slay it for a sin offering in the place where they kill the burnt offering. 34 And the priest shall take of the blood of the sin offering with his finger, and put [it] upon the horns of the altar of burnt offering, and shall pour out all the blood thereof at the bottom of the altar: 35 And he shall take away all the fat thereof, as the fat of the lamb is taken away from the sacrifice of the peace offerings; and the priest shall burn them upon the altar, according to the offerings made by fire unto the LORD: and the priest shall make an atonement for his sin that he hath committed, and it shall be forgiven him.

Verse 2 says “If a soul sin through ignorance” This statement goes way beyond “ignorance of the law is no excuse…”. What it establishes is that morality, right and wrong exist outside of ourselves. There is something in human nature that excuses ourselves “if we didn’t know better…” as though sin was a personal matter. The broader term we use to describe this is subjectivism. The implication is that there is no objective truth and that situational ethics apply making morality a matter of personal choice rather than eternal truth that every soul is answerable to. The idea that “I’m ok, your ok” arises from a viewpoint that God does not exist and personal opinion is the highest authority.

[Rom 3:23 KJV] 23 For all have sinned, and come short of the glory of God;

[Rom 5:12 KJV] 12 Wherefore, as by one man sin entered into the world, and death by sin; and so death passed upon all men, for that all have sinned:

Verse 3 deals with the sins of a priest serving in the tabernacle. Here again a concept that would have been foreign to ancient peoples. No one is exempted. Parents with their children always adopt a “do what I say don’t do what I do attitude”. There heart of hypocrisy is holding others accountable to a standard that we don’t apply to ourselves.

As a young pastor I had a group of people in my church who smoked. They invited a young Christian to a prayer meeting in their home who also smoked. He attended for many weeks and the custom was everyone would go outside and have a cigarette before prayer meeting and then adjourn inside for a time of prayer. One day after everyone had had their smoke they came inside to pray and the host hauled their 16 year old boy in front of the group who had been caught smoking himself that day. They proceeded to attempt to cast a demon of nicotine out of the boy! This completely scandalized the young convert who saw the hypocrisy that none of the others in through group saw. No one is exempt from God’s law.

[Rom 11:32 KJV] 32 For God hath concluded them all in unbelief, that he might have mercy upon all.

Verse 6 – the priest would offer shed blood to deal with his sin. God’s manner of dealing with sin does not prescribe justice but redemption. The blood of the sacrifice represents Jesus dying for our transgression. We don’t bring our good works, or our good intentions, or excuses or justifications before the judgment bar of our conscience. We bring the blood of Jesus. Notice the blood was sprinkled seven times before the vial that was closed barring the way into the holy of holies. The picture is obvious – the shed blood of the sacrifice opens the way for us into deeper intimacy with God. This is how God deals with sin, by drawing us into deeper relationship with him – He brings us into his pretense and when we see Him we become like Him for we see Him as He is.

[1Jo 3:1-2 KJV] 1 Behold, what manner of love the Father hath bestowed upon us, that we should be called the sons of God: therefore the world knoweth us not, because it knew him not. 2 Beloved, now are we the sons of God, and it doth not yet appear what we shall be: but we know that, when he shall appear, we shall be like him; for we shall see him as he is.

Verses 11 – 21

Once the sin offering is made the ashes of the offering are taken out of the camp and disposed of in a ceremonially clean place. The ashes represent the image of Jesus being taken off the cross and laid in tomb. He has paid the price and become sin.

[2Co 5:21 KJV] 21 For he hath made him [to be] sin for us, who knew no sin; that we might be made the righteousness of God in him.

What does God do with sin? He takes it away out of his sight in order to establish unbroken relationship with us.

[Psa 103:12-17 KJV] 12 As far as the east is from the west, [so] far hath he removed our transgressions from us. 13 Like as a father pitieth [his] children, [so] the LORD pitieth them that fear him. 14 For he knoweth our frame; he remembereth that we [are] dust. 15 [As for] man, his days [are] as grass: as a flower of the field, so he flourisheth. 16 For the wind passeth over it, and it is gone; and the place thereof shall know it no more. 17 But the mercy of the LORD [is] from everlasting to everlasting upon them that fear him, and his righteousness unto children’s children;

Verse 13 establishes that not only can an individual sin but a whole nation can sin. Notice the repeated mention of sinning through ignorance. We tend to point a finger at all sin and accuse the offender saying “you knew what you were doing…” But there is a higher perspective that comes from the heart of God’s mercy. Remember the words of Jesus on the cross:

[Luk 23:34 KJV] 34 Then said Jesus, Father, forgive them; for they know not what they do. And they parted his raiment, and cast lots.

Paul echoes this sentiment in 1 Cor. 2:8:

[1Co 2:8 KJV] 8 Which none of the princes of this world knew: for had they known [it], they would not have crucified the Lord of glory.

Even those who cried out for Jesus’ death and those who drove the nails in his hands had they realized the cosmic role they were playing would not have done so. If this is the perspective of God’s mercy we must extend the same mercy even to those we are not so willing to forgive.

Verses 22 – 35

Here we see the universal prescription for dealing with sin.

If the priest sin – “he shall bring an offering”
If the ruler sin – “he shall bring an offering”
If the common man sins – “he shall bring an offering”.

Notice the offering is not a grain offering but a sacrificial animal. Shed sacrificial blood is the only solution for sin.

The grain offering represents our works. This was the difference between Cain’s offering and Abel’s. Abel’s offering was accepted because he offering atoning blood in acknowledgment of his own need of a savior. Cain bypassed the consideration of his own need of a savior and offering a grain offering only as though he could negotiate with God without acknowledging his own lost condition.

Performance based religion, or a performance based approach to God denies our need of a savior and rejects the Lordship of Jesus Christ in our lives. In order to correct this and deliver of from ourselves God gave us the law as our schoolmaster to bring us to Christ. We exhaust ourselves trying to solve our problems on our own until we collapse at the foot of the cross and finally confess that we need a savior.

In the shed blood of the sacrifice we are expressing our faith not in ourselves or what we have done but in who Jesus is and what He has done for us. We are not bringing God our best intentions or accomplishments we are throwing ourselves upon the mercy of the court of heaven appealing not to our own excuses but offering up the shed blood of Christ for the expiation of our sins and as the basis of all answered prayer.

[Leviticus 3] Friendship with God in the Peace Offering. In this chapter, we learn about a form of sacrifice called the peace offering. In the peace offering, we are acknowledging that Jesus is our peace, expressing covenantal friendship with God even as Abraham did of old. The peace offering called for special handling of the blood, and fat, and kidneys of the sacrificial animal. These were considered the choicest parts of the animal and reflected, giving God the best of ourselves even as God has given us His best in Jesus Christ.

[Lev 3:1-17 KJV] 1 And if his oblation [be] a sacrifice of peace offering, if he offer [it] of the herd; whether [it be] a male or female, he shall offer it without blemish before the LORD. 2 And he shall lay his hand upon the head of his offering, and kill it [at] the door of the tabernacle of the congregation: and Aaron’s sons the priests shall sprinkle the blood upon the altar round about. 3 And he shall offer of the sacrifice of the peace offering an offering made by fire unto the LORD; the fat that covereth the inwards, and all the fat that [is] upon the inwards, 4 And the two kidneys, and the fat that [is] on them, which [is] by the flanks, and the caul above the liver, with the kidneys, it shall he take away. 5 And Aaron’s sons shall burn it on the altar upon the burnt sacrifice, which [is] upon the wood that [is] on the fire: [it is] an offering made by fire, of a sweet savour unto the LORD. 6 And if his offering for a sacrifice of peace offering unto the LORD [be] of the flock; male or female, he shall offer it without blemish. 7 If he offer a lamb for his offering, then shall he offer it before the LORD. 8 And he shall lay his hand upon the head of his offering, and kill it before the tabernacle of the congregation: and Aaron’s sons shall sprinkle the blood thereof round about upon the altar. 9 And he shall offer of the sacrifice of the peace offering an offering made by fire unto the LORD; the fat thereof, [and] the whole rump, it shall he take off hard by the backbone; and the fat that covereth the inwards, and all the fat that [is] upon the inwards, 10 And the two kidneys, and the fat that [is] upon them, which [is] by the flanks, and the caul above the liver, with the kidneys, it shall he take away. 11 And the priest shall burn it upon the altar: [it is] the food of the offering made by fire unto the LORD. 12 And if his offering [be] a goat, then he shall offer it before the LORD. 13 And he shall lay his hand upon the head of it, and kill it before the tabernacle of the congregation: and the sons of Aaron shall sprinkle the blood thereof upon the altar round about. 14 And he shall offer thereof his offering, [even] an offering made by fire unto the LORD; the fat that covereth the inwards, and all the fat that [is] upon the inwards, 15 And the two kidneys, and the fat that [is] upon them, which [is] by the flanks, and the caul above the liver, with the kidneys, it shall he take away. 16 And the priest shall burn them upon the altar: [it is] the food of the offering made by fire for a sweet savour: all the fat [is] the LORD’S. 17 [It shall be] a perpetual statute for your generations throughout all your dwellings, that ye eat neither fat nor blood.

In Leviticus chapter three (vs. 1-5), we find instructions concerning the peace offering. So far, we have learned about the two kinds of consecration offerings (animal sacrifice and grain offerings). Now we turn our attention to a different oblation called the peace offering. Each of these offerings speaks to us of who Jesus is to us and also God’s process by which He works in our lives. Interestingly, we haven’t gotten to the trespass offering yet. You would think that would be first. As it was in the mention of the sacred furniture when it was installed, the Ark of the Covenant (speaking of God’s mercy) is mentioned first, and the Brazen Altar (where sin was addressed came last). This shows us that repentance for sin from a scriptural standpoint is not an object in itself, but a means to the end of entering into an intimate relationship with God.

The peace offering is considered a “requital offering” (meaning something returned in response to a service rendered). It is brought as a symbolic way of requiting God for what He has done on behalf of the worshipper. The full definition comes from the word rendered “peace” in v. 1 is the Hebrew word, “shelem” meaning “peace offering, requital, sacrifice for alliance or friendship voluntary sacrifice of thanks.” The Israelite bringing his peace offering to God did so in recognition that Abraham was the friend of God and that he is seeking that same friendship in bringing a peace offering.

The word friend here is not intended the way we use it in modern times. We are not asking God to be our “buddy.” The word friend comes from the Arabic word “afendi,” which means “blood covenant partner.” It points back to Gen. 15 when God came down in a column of light and smoke and passed between the pieces of the sacrifice and ratified a unidirectional covenant with Abraham and according to Paul Jesus himself. In offering the worshipper would lay his hand upon the head of the sacrifice in recognition and identification. The head represents lordship. It was an act of submission and also saying I am not merely giving of myself, but I am giving MYSELF in entirety to God in a figure through this offering.

In choosing an animal for this sacrifice, not just any old barnyard resident would be considered acceptable. The offering was to be a perfect specimen (vs. 6-11). It was not acceptable to give God the leftovers or the lame or diseased (although in times of spiritual decline, this was what the Israelites did). King David understood this when he purchased the land whereupon the Temple would be built:

[2Sa 24:24 KJV] 24 And the king said unto Araunah, Nay; but I will surely buy [it] of thee at a price: neither will I offer burnt offerings unto the LORD my God of that which doth cost me nothing.

David bought the threshing-floor and the oxen at great price. What does this tell us? In coming to Christ, we must make a full surrender. Contaminated, half-hearted offerings of ourselves to God provokes his silence and his withdrawal from our lives. When you can’t find God, and His presence seems far away, perhaps an examination of your yieldedness and fidelity to His Spirit would be in order. In the days of Malachi, the priesthood and the people used the Altar of God as a veritable garbage disposal. In Malachi 1:7-8, God speaks against this in a relevant way for our self-examination today:

[Mal 1:7-8 KJV] 7 Ye offer polluted bread upon mine altar; and ye say, Wherein have we polluted thee? In that ye say, The table of the LORD [is] contemptible. 8 And if ye offer the blind for sacrifice, [is it] not evil? and if ye offer the lame and sick, [is it] not evil? offer it now unto thy governor; will he be pleased with thee, or accept thy person? saith the LORD of hosts.

Malachi goes on speaking by the spirit of God crying out, “would someone who loves and honors simply put out the light in the temple and shut the doors?” We should never forget that in coming to God through Christ, we are not merely adding a spiritual dimension to lives lived in self-determination. God is a jealous God. He wants all or nothing. One writer made the following statement about God’s white-hot jealousy for our devotion: “God’s jealousy does not arise from fear or weakness but from holy indignation at having His honor and power and mercy scorned by the faithless bride….”

When the offering was made, part of it was burned completely, and a portion was divided to the priests and at times, even back to the worshipper who would eat it before the tabernacle (vs. 12-17). However, the fat and the kidneys and the blood were always the part offered only to God. In our culture, we don’t prize these organs as delicacies, but they were considered the choicest parts in ancient times. The blood was also revered, and the people were forbidden from taking any part of it. The blood was that which contained the life of the animal. Leviticus 17:10 says, “the life is in the blood.” When you give blood to God, you are giving Him your life. When He gives you His blood, He is giving you His life. The life of God is in you by the shedding of the blood of Christ.

The kidneys in ancient times were looked upon as the seat of emotions and passion. When you offered up kidneys in sacrifice, you were giving God your deepest desires and emotions. Amazing that in religious culture, we reject displays of emotions, but those same people who stoically sit before God stone-faced and silent will scream themselves hoarse at a sporting event. Even more astonishing is that these same people see absolutely no contradiction in this disparity! When we withhold our passion and emotion from God, we violate the foreshadowing in this chapter of rendering up to God of our very best.

What does fat represent? The fat speaks of surplus. In modern times we are people surrounded by excess. In America alone, 126 billion pounds of food end up in the landfill, right at half of our national food consumption. We throw away enough food to feed the starving nations many times over. Obesity is a growing epidemic that has become a crisis that is crippling our health institutions and predicted to crush our economies with the weight of our own excess. In both the Old and New Testament, there was repeated and strong emphasis on giving of your surplus to the poor in service to God. Why is the fat represented as being exclusively for God? You will note in v. 3 that it was explicitly the fat that covered the internal organs that God instructed must be wholly offered to Him. To the ancient people, the organs represented the personality and character of a person. One commenter puts it this way: “When God wanted the fat surrounding the entrails, He was telling the Hebrews that the heart, feeling and character of man belonged to him.” What about you? Are you restricting your innermost being as being for God and only for God? Are there divided loyalties regarding God’s word where you obey the scripture in one area but conveniently ignore it in another. God is a God who demands all or nothing. Let your commitment to Him be entire today.

[Leviticus Chapter Two] Becoming a Salted Offering to God. In Leviticus two we find instruction regarding the grain offering. The grain offering is the only offering that was seen as an “offering of the soul”. In giving the grain offering God saw it as literally giving your soul to God. The grain offering was required to be offered with salt, oil, and frankincense. This speaks to us of the wholesome restoration and balance God wants to bring into your life as you offer yourself to him. A very encouraging message today.

[Lev 2:1-16 KJV] 1 And when any will offer a meat offering unto the LORD, his offering shall be [of] fine flour; and he shall pour oil upon it, and put frankincense thereon: 2 And he shall bring it to Aaron’s sons the priests: and he shall take thereout his handful of the flour thereof, and of the oil thereof, with all the frankincense thereof; and the priest shall burn the memorial of it upon the altar, [to be] an offering made by fire, of a sweet savour unto the LORD: 3 And the remnant of the meat offering [shall be] Aaron’s and his sons’: [it is] a thing most holy of the offerings of the LORD made by fire. 4 And if thou bring an oblation of a meat offering baken in the oven, [it shall be] unleavened cakes of fine flour mingled with oil, or unleavened wafers anointed with oil. 5 And if thy oblation [be] a meat offering [baken] in a pan, it shall be [of] fine flour unleavened, mingled with oil. 6 Thou shalt part it in pieces, and pour oil thereon: it [is] a meat offering. 7 And if thy oblation [be] a meat offering [baken] in the fryingpan, it shall be made [of] fine flour with oil. 8 And thou shalt bring the meat offering that is made of these things unto the LORD: and when it is presented unto the priest, he shall bring it unto the altar. 9 And the priest shall take from the meat offering a memorial thereof, and shall burn [it] upon the altar: [it is] an offering made by fire, of a sweet savour unto the LORD. 10 And that which is left of the meat offering [shall be] Aaron’s and his sons’: [it is] a thing most holy of the offerings of the LORD made by fire. 11 No meat offering, which ye shall bring unto the LORD, shall be made with leaven: for ye shall burn no leaven, nor any honey, in any offering of the LORD made by fire. 12 As for the oblation of the firstfruits, ye shall offer them unto the LORD: but they shall not be burnt on the altar for a sweet savour. 13 And every oblation of thy meat offering shalt thou season with salt; neither shalt thou suffer the salt of the covenant of thy God to be lacking from thy meat offering: with all thine offerings thou shalt offer salt. 14 And if thou offer a meat offering of thy firstfruits unto the LORD, thou shalt offer for the meat offering of thy firstfruits green ears of corn dried by the fire, [even] corn beaten out of full ears. 15 And thou shalt put oil upon it, and lay frankincense thereon: it [is] a meat offering. 16 And the priest shall burn the memorial of it, [part] of the beaten corn thereof, and [part] of the oil thereof, with all the frankincense thereof: [it is] an offering made by fire unto the LORD.

Verses 1-5

The “meat offering” was actually not an animal sacrifice but consisted of meal or grain. At the time the King James Bible was written the term meat referred to food in general and not just food derived from animals. The typical meal or grain offering of different types always included meal, cooked or uncooked, frankincense and oil.

The Hebrew word here is “minkha” and it derives from an Arabic word “to give”. The meat or meal offering is actually somewhat controversial because the very first meal offering mentioned in the bible is the rejected offering of Cain. However throughout the Old Testament meal offerings were otherwise just as acceptable as animal sacrifice.

In the original language of verse one implies the meaning “if any soul will offer an offering to God…” This is the only time the Hebrew word for soul is used (in reference to the meal offering). The meal offering was provided in order to make available an acceptable offering from a poor person. The giving of this offering was viewed as though the person was giving his very soul to God.

The ingredients of the meal offering:

Fine Flour – Jesus is the Bread of Heaven

Oil – The Holy Spirit is the Oil of God

Frankincense – ???

Frankincense comes from a tree in the Boswellia genus. Boswellia trees are considered unusual because they are known at times to grow out of solid rock. This tree therefore speaks to us of Jesus who is the “root out of dry ground”:

[Isa 53:2 KJV] 2 For he shall grow up before him as a tender plant, and as a root out of a dry ground: he hath no form nor comeliness; and when we shall see him, [there is] no beauty that we should desire him.

It is extracted from a resin obtained by slashing the bark. Jesus’ back was slashed for our healing and frankincense is held to have medicinal properties for healing. Always remember in reading these verses that they are intended to tell us something about who Jesus is to us. The resins that are extracted from these trees are called tears.

[Isa 53:3 KJV] 3 He is despised and rejected of men; a man of sorrows, and acquainted with grief: and we hid as it were [our] faces from him; he was despised, and we esteemed him not.

Remember the word for meal offering is “minkhah” which also means tribute. In the giving of this offering we are paying tribute to what Jesus has done for us. This meal offering is reflected in the New Testament in the ordinance of communion.

Verses 6 – 11

The meal offering was to be parted in pieces and then oil was to be poured upon it. The oil represents the anointing. In speaking of the kingdom of God in Matthew’s gospel Jesus likened it to a stone:

[Mat 21:44 KJV] 44 And whosoever shall fall on this stone shall be broken: but on whomsoever it shall fall, it will grind him to powder.

We cry out to God for anointing but anointing doesn’t come upon an unbroken, unyielding vessel. The gifts and callings of God are without repentance but anointing is another matter. Many believers are miserable because they have an un-withdrawn calling but are unbroken and without anointing. I know what it is to minister without anointing because of disobedience. I spent one year ministering without anointing because I would not obey God in a call to a new assignment. It was one of the most miserable times of my life.

Notice that these offerings were offered to God by fire but a portion of them went to Aaron and his sons. Aaron is a type of Jesus himself. Aaron’s name means “light bringer” and Jesus is the “daystar arising in our hearts”. But notice not just Aaron was to receive his portion of the offering but also those assisting him in the work of the service of the tabernacle. This speaks to us of the ministry. I remember a prophetic word given over us that the time would come in our lives that the people would throw their money at Jesus’ feet and he would gathering it up and throw it at our feet.

Verses 12 – 16

The oblation of first fruits was handled differently as is the case with almost every mention of first fruits of differing kinds in the bible. Jesus is the first fruits from the dead and the first born of many brethren. The people came out of Egypt after the plague on the first born in which those who sprinkled the blood on their door post were spared. Because of this God always claims the first of anything to be his peculiar possession.

Every meat offering was to be include salt. Numbers 18:19 speaks of the covenant of salt. Matt. 5:13 says that WE are the salt of the earth and if we are not included the earth “loses is taste or savor”.

What do we know about salt? When an acid and a base are combined together they form a salt. An engineer trained in chemistry heard the Father say “this is how I want my people to be – perfectly balanced”.

The salt molecule is made of sodium and chlorine. If you put metallic sodium in water it reacts violently and produces fire. Water represents the word. When we mix the word with imbalance we want to call down fire from heaven and find ourselves describing revival in terms of Ananias and Sapphira. The sodium has one outer electron and chloride has seven. Both are unstable because atoms in this size seek a stable configuration of eight electrons otherwise it is incomplete. There must be a balance between judgment and mercy, priest and king, male and female. In that way the explosive properties of imbalance are addressed and the preservative, beneficial properties of salt are available to us.

God told Abraham in Gen. 15:1 “I am your exceeding great reward …” the word reward here is the Hebrew word for salt. My grandmother mentored my father and often said “prayer without the word leads to fanaticism… the word without prayer leads to legalism…” We need balance. This can be difficult in a world where the most shrill voice is the one that attracts the most people. We have an appetite for extremes. But God is desiring to bring us into divine balance.